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Archive for: September 2020

Thrapston Under 14’s Girls Football Team Reveal their Sponsor!

The draw is done!

Thrapston Under 14’s Girls Football Team have completed their fund raising efforts and now reveal their official 2020/21 sponsor…..

 

Auburn Fox – the latest retailer to open on Thrapston’s High Street will be on the girl’s rain jackets.

The team would like to say a huge thank you to everyone who has donated and supported them, and also those who weren’t able to donate but offered support in other ways. Unfortunately, they didn’t quite hit their target, which means right now they cannot get all the kit they were hoping for.

Funding organiser, Jon Hunt  has therefore decided, that as the weather is turning, that he will  order some rain jackets, and that the Auburn Fox will be featured on those.

Leaving the GoFundMe page open with the hope they can find a few more donations from local business that will allow them to get the rest of the kit to keep the team warm, and for those they will run a second draw.

Jon will place the first draw recording in the comments on Facebook to show the draw in action – Jon adds “Once again, I need to express how grateful we are, and blessed that we have such a supportive community and network of businesses”

You can read about the fund raising project here – https://www.nenelocal.co.uk/2020/09/thrapston-14s-girls-football-get-creative-fun-raising/  

You can donate to go into the second draw here  https://gf.me/u/yy42m5  Please dig deep!!

A big thank you to all businesses who have donated so far.  Nene Local Magazine is happy to give a shout out on the Welcome to Thrapston page for any business who has donated and any who donate in the next week – to secure your shout out, please comment on this article with the URL to your business page.

 

thrapston girls football team

 

Planning Applications: 23 September 2020 WEEKLY LIST

To add your comments to any planning applications – click on the ENC website or click the link below to go directly to the article you require.

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Notice is given that the following applications have been received together with the last date for making representations:

Islip

20/01036/LBC

(27 October 2020) (CA)(LB) To replace the thatched roof for like for like structure; alteration works to internal layout as listed on the Heritage Impact Assessment

1 The Green Islip Applicant: Mr C. L. Stopford-Sackville

 

Ashton

20/01056/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA) The proposals comprise replacing the existing single glazed windows in the rear and side elevations – downstairs bathroom (single window), kitchen (double), third bedroom

(double) and upstairs WC (single) to the rear, and master bedroom (triple window) landing (double) to the side – with double glazed aluminium casements (Alitherm Heritage), matching the windows currently in place in appearance so as not to compromise the integrity of the building.

The existing stone lintels and openings will be used Cherry Tree Cottage 28 The Green Ashton

Applicant: Miss Carina Horan

 

Twywell

20/01020/LBC

(27 October 2020) (LB) Listed Building Consent for the external and internal alterations to these barns to facilitate their conversion to four residential dwellings Manor Farm High Street Twywell

Applicant: Tata Steel (UK) Ltd

 

Warmington

20/01115/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA) Conversion of two residential outbuildings at 3 Spinney Close, to form two residential dwelling houses including external alterations 3 Spinney Close Warmington

Applicant: OCS Developments – Ms S Bateman

 

Apethorpe

20/01149/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA) The amalgamation of a pair of semi-detached cottages into a single dwelling, namely The Stocks & Manor Farm Cottage The Stocks Main Street Apethorpe

Applicant: Mr And Mrs Brassey

 

Warmington

20/01114/OUT

(27 October 2020) (CA) Outline application for two serviced residential plots (self/custom-build) with access as a matter for consideration 3 Spinney Close Warmington Applicant:

OCS Developments – Ms S Bateman

 

 

Duddington With Fineshade

20/01138/LBC

(27 October 2020) (CA)(LB) Installation of metal arbour; Altering the height of  existing wall;   installation of steps; Erection of a low retaining wall. Beaumont House High Street Duddington

Applicant: Mrs Lisa Warner

 

Tansor

20/01073/LBC

(27 October 2020) (LB) Internal alterations to manor house including removal of fabric Tansor Manor Fotheringhay Road Tansor

Applicant: Mr And Mrs Jonathan Smith

 

Cotterstock

20/01039/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA) Change of use of (fenced) agricultural land to become part of the residential curtilage of Little Beeches Land Adjoining Little Beeches And The Dovehouse Main Street Cotterstock

Applicant: Mr M Kroese

 

Irthlingborough

20/00997/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA) Erection of block of 8 flats with associated vehicular access, parking and landscaping Car Park Rear Of High Street St Peters Way Irthlingborough

Applicant: Resham PLC

 

Thrapston

20/01117/LBC

(27 October 2020) (LB) This application is for the investigation of the arch barrels of Nine Arches Bridge by taking cores in order to check both the thickness and condition of the masonry of both the main arches and the wing arches as well as to ascertain existence and extent of concrete backing with a view to increasing the assessed capacity and to determine the extent of ring separation and the number of rings separated. Nine Arches Bridge Bridge Street Thrapston

Applicant: KierWSP/ Northamptonshire

Highways – Mr A Prud’homme

 

Twywell

20/01019/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA)(ART 15) Full

Planning Application for the conversion of four disused agricultural buildings into four residential dwellings (Class C3), associated external alterations to the barns and infrastructure Manor Farm High Street Twywell

Applicant: Tata Steel (UK) Ltd

Ashton

20/01057/LBC

(27 October 2020) (LB) Replace the existing single-glazed windows in the rear and side elevations – downstairs bathroom (single window), kitchen (double), third bedroom (double) and upstairs WC (single) to the rear, and master bedroom (triple window) landing (double) to the side – with double-glazed aluminium casements (Alitherm Heritage), matching the windows currently in place in appearance so as not to compromise the integrity of the building. The existing stone lintels and openings will be used Cherry Tree Cottage 28 The Green Ashton

Applicant: Miss Carina Horan

 

Lowick And Slipton

20/01096/VAR

(27 October 2020) (CA) Variation of condition 2 to allow change to proposed plans and elevations pursuant to 19/01242/FUL – Erect log cabin structure to the front of property Condition 2 – Change to Proposed Plans & Elevations 15 Main Street Lowick

Applicant: Mr Adam Hughes

 

Wakerley

20/01094/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA) Single storey oak framed orangery extension to rear 4 Main Street Wakerley

Applicant: Mr Peter Nicholls

 

Rushden

20/01136/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA) Change of use from retail unit to taxi office 107 High Street Rushden

Applicant: Mr James Gentle

 

Great Addington

20/01023/LBC

(27 October 2020) (LB) Demolition of curtilage listed single storey stables following destruction of original stable block in fire Stables The Manor House Cranford Road

Applicant: Mr Stephen Chard

 

Duddington With Fineshade

20/01045/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA) Change of use from Paddock/parking area to garaging and hardstanding

The Village Hall Church Lane Duddington

Applicant: Mr M Constant

 

Higham Ferrers

20/01048/FUL

(27 October 2020) (CA) Change of Use from A1 Retail to C3 Residential apartment Unit 1A Wharf Road Higham Ferrers

Applicant: Mrs Natasha Akathiotis

£400 Fine for Littering Out of Car Window

Drop your litter and face the consequences. That’s the stark message from East Northamptonshire Council (ENC) who recently prosecuted a driver for just such an offence.

 

Back in January, an ENC environmental services officer witnessed the driver throw an empty cigarette packet out of his car window on Kettering Road, Thrapston. The driver was identified as Ryan Potticary and was offered a fixed penalty notice of £150 (reduced to £100 if paid within 10 days). Despite reminders being sent, Mr Potticary failed to pay the fine and was then referred to court where he was offered the opportunity to enter a plea by post. Again, he failed to reply so the case went to Northampton Magistrates Court in August. Mr Potticary did not attend but was found guilty and received a £402 fine. (£220 fine plus a £32 victim surcharge and £150 costs).

 

Steven North, Leader of ENC, said: “All littering is an offence no matter what it is and we all need to take responsibility by using a bin or taking our rubbish home. And that’s not just to avoid a fine but to protect where we live, work, play and drive.

 

“I hope that this case serves as a warning that we will hold those who litter to account and we will pursue through the courts, if necessary. Avoid that hefty fine and do the right thing – bin it.”

don't be a litter bug

Funding Approved for Peace Park Centenary Project in Thrapston

Residents of Thrapston are set to enjoy improved park facilities, thanks to a grant of £45,000 from FCC Communities Foundation.

Thrapston Peace Park

The money will be used to install accessible paths and a poppy shaped meeting area at Thrapston Peace Park on Market Road, Thrapston.

Mayor of Thrapston, Councillor Karen Draycott, believes the facility will make a huge difference to the lives of people living in the area.

She says: “This project will provide a real boost to the people of Thrapston by providing a beautiful, accessible place for residents to spend more time outdoors. It’s fantastic that FCC Communities Foundation has awarded us this money and we’re really looking forward to the park enhancements taking shape over the next few months.

FCC Communities Foundation is a not-for-profit business that awards grants for community projects through the Landfill Communities Fund.

Richard Smith, FCC Communities Foundation Senior Grant Manager, says: “We’re delighted to be supporting the access improvements at the Peace Park and pleased our funding will improve such a beautiful green space for people across Thrapston. FCC Communities Foundation is always happy to consider grant applications for projects that make a difference to local communities and we’re really looking forward to seeing this one take shape soon.”Residents of Thrapston are set to enjoy improved park facilities, thanks to a grant of £45,000 from FCC Communities Foundation.  The money will be used to install accessible paths and a poppy shaped meeting area at Thrapston Peace Park on Market Road, Thrapston.  Mayor of Thrapston, Councillor Karen Draycott, believes the facility will make a huge difference to the lives of people living in the area.  She says: “This project will provide a real boost to the people of Thrapston by providing a beautiful, accessible place for residents to spend more time outdoors. It’s fantastic that FCC Communities Foundation has awarded us this money and we’re really looking forward to the park enhancements taking shape over the next few months.  FCC Communities Foundation is a not-for-profit business that awards grants for community projects through the Landfill Communities Fund. Richard Smith, FCC Communities Foundation Senior Grant Manager, says: “We’re delighted to be supporting the access improvements at the Peace Park and pleased our funding will improve such a beautiful green space for people across Thrapston. FCC Communities Foundation is always happy to consider grant applications for projects that make a difference to local communities and we’re really looking forward to seeing this one take shape soon.” Councillor Draycott hopes the Peace Park improvements will be ready to use by mid-December 2020. The new paths and meeting area are part of a wider schedule of works being undertaken by Thrapston Town Council to mark 100 years since the Peace Park was dedicated to the town as a War Memorial.

Councillor Draycott hopes the Peace Park improvements will be ready to use by mid-December 2020. The new paths and meeting area are part of a wider schedule of works being undertaken by Thrapston Town Council to mark 100 years since the Peace Park was dedicated to the town as a War Memorial.

Thrapston Under 14’s Girls Football get Creative with Fund Raising

Thrapston Girls U14 Football Club ask a local business each year to sponsor their kit and in turn have their logos on all the shirts.

Due  to the pandemic they knew it was a big ask in 2020 to ask one business to shoulder the sponsorship alone.  With their creative heads on they hatched a brilliant plan….

thrapston girls football team

The’re asking any local business who wants to help out to donate £20 (or any multiples of £20),  You can donate here

https://gf.me/u/yy42m5

Then once all the donations are in, the footballing girls will do a prize draw and make one lucky business the sponsorship winner!  That business will have their logo on the shirts for the season.

More information can be found here  https://gf.me/u/yy42m5

 

The Beauty of the Nene Valley Captured During Lockdown

Photographers from around the UK captured the beauty of the Nene Valley during the pandemic lockdown this year. Entries for the Nene Valley Photography Competition 2020 attracted a stunning selection of photographs showcasing the wildlife, culture and heritage of this beautiful location.

 

With over 130 photographs entered across three categories, the judges had a hard task to agree the winners. Entries spanned the length of the Nene Valley highlighting it as a much-loved destination by many.

 

The competition was organised by Destination Nene Valley as part of the Nenescape Landscape Partnership, a National Lottery Heritage Funded project to explore the people, heritage and identity of the changing landscape in the Nene Valley. Photographs from the competition with credits to the photographers are featured on the Nene Valley website at https://nenevalley.net/photography-competition-winners-2020/

The judging panel was made up from representatives of Destination Nene Valley, East Northamptonshire Council, Nenescape and One to One Development Trust.

 

Cllr Steven North, Leader of East Northamptonshire Council said:

 

“The range of photographs we received and the talent behind them is incredibly impressive. Picking winners in each category was incredibly difficult, as all the submissions were excellent. The partners look forward to featuring a selection of them on the Nene Valley website for everyone to enjoy”.

 

The winning entries will receive prizes of vouchers for 1st prize £75, 2nd prize £50, 3rd prize £25.

 

The winners in each category are:

 

Landscape

  • 1st Leslie Ranford – Sunrise at Elton Mill
  • 2nd Frances Guilfoyle – Social Distancing near Hardwater Rd, Wollaston
  • 3rd Carl Everitt – Still Waters Irthlingborough Lakes and Meadows

 

Nature and wildlife

  • 1st Adrian Leybourne – Barn Owl near Wollaston Lock and the River Nene
  • 2nd Joy Tildesley – Grebe Expectations Irthlingborough Lakes and Meadows
  • 3rd Wayne Bettles – ‘Move over’ On the strip of water next to the Middle Nene Cruising Club

 

Resilient Nene during Covid-19

  • 1st Chris Porsz – Artists making murals during Covid – Peterborough underpass, Taveners Rd
  • 2nd Andrew Thomas – Social distancing on the River Nene, Nine Arches Bridge, Thrapston
  • 3rd Jennie Tansley – Fotheringhay delight – Paddle boarding the socially distancing way

 

For more information about the Nene Valley and to see a gallery including the winning entries please visit www.nenevalley.net

Warts and All Theatre in Wellingborough

Warts and All Theatre announces new Autumn theatre programmes in Wellingborough

  • Warts and All Theatre launches new programmes for the Autumn
  • Discounted ‘Pay On Your Terms’ model means that everyone will be able to participate
  • Sign-up today by visiting wartsandalltheatre.co.uk/be-a-wart

 

Warts and All Theatre, Northamptonshire’s cutting-edge theatre company that enables everyone to speak their truth, is announcing a new programme of activity at their new Wellingborough home, the Wellingborough African Caribbean Centre.

This dynamic programme will give people of all ages a chance to engage in life-changing extraordinary theatre, through a diverse selection of weekly activity, including:

  • Young Actors sessions for ages 9-21 – These workshops provide a fantastic training opportunity for children and young people, as participants work collaboratively with trained and experienced industry experts. Alongside learning theatre, drama skills and techniques, these sessions are a great opportunity for a Young Person to develop their confidence, public speaking and teamworking skills.
  • Young Producers sessions for ages 12-25 – Through these free weekly sessions you will become ambassadors for Warts and All Theatre’s Young Artist Festival in 2021. Grow your skills as a creative, develop friendships and create an extraordinary festival of art and culture for your community!

From September Warts and All Theatre will place their trust in parents and guardians as they move to a new “Pay On Your Terms” membership scheme, where participants choose a scheme that suits their personal situation.

£10, £20 and £30 monthly direct debit options are available, with all members receiving the same benefits and access to outstanding weekly sessions, but can now choose what they pay based on everyone’s personal circumstances.

“It’s all part of our renewed vision to make arts and culture accessible for as many people as possible. By offering a more flexible way of engaging with us, we will make more voices heard, society fairer and in turn enable communities to thrive,” says Christopher Elmer-Gorry, Artistic Director and CEO of Warts and All Theatre.

Participants of Warts and All Theatre programmes are also excited. Kirsten Harris, 20 from Wellingborough said: “Going to Warts and All allows me to feel comfortable to say whatever it is I want to say, to speak up, to say what truly matters to you and have that be respected, and having a space to fully explore what your truth is.”

Warts and All Theatre are delivering this activity in line with their socially distanced COVID-19 secure planning, policies and procedures. Each activity has a face to face, blended learning or online provision that will be delivered based on local and national developments and guidance.

warts and all theatre

They are no stranger to adapting their delivery. Over the past five months, Warts and All has ran successful online masterclasses with some of the leading lights in the theatre world such as Adrian Lester, Benjamin Zephaniah, Fiona Shaw, Rob Brydon and Julie Walters, as well as virtual co-created plays and online acting training sessions. These programmes have meant that young people and their families have continued to have the chance to share their experiences, express themselves and remain in touch with the arts during lockdown.

For more information on Warts and All Theatre’s exciting new weekly programmes and to sign up, visit wartsandalltheatre.co.uk/be-a-wart or email hello@wartsandalltheatre.co.uk

Launch of Doubling Nature Action Plan for Cambridgeshire

This September, Natural Cambridgeshire is launching its ambitious action plan for doubling the area of rich wildlife habitats and natural green space across the region in order to create a world-class environment.

 

During an online event on the 16th September 2020, attendees can hear from keynote speakers Dame Fiona Reynolds and Lord Chris Smith. Plus, they will discover further regional initiatives to protect, preserve and enhance the environment. These include key landscape projects, local nature recovery plans, individual pledges, and a look at the benefits of nature-friendly farming.

 

Natural Cambridgeshire will launch four crucial initiatives designed to deliver the doubling nature ambition:

 

  1. A landscape-led approach, that will put Peterborough and Cambridgeshire firmly on the map of nature recovery as nature thrives across the county. Natural Cambridgeshire has identified five key landscapes with the potential to deliver significant benefits for nature and enhanced access to green open space for residents.
  2. A community approach – a toolkit of small steps that each community can make to double nature close to home – for example, if every parish in the county planted ten trees a year for ten years that would be nearly 40,000 trees!
  3. A doubling nature pledge through which individuals, businesses and other organisations can play their part in the ambition, whether it is planting more pollinating plants in gardens or greening up work-place car parks, there is something that everyone can do.
  4. Natural Cambridgeshire will also be announcing plans for a Doubling Nature Investment Fund, to provide the resources to make all this happen.

 

The health and sustainability of our environment has never been so critical: the climate crisis and loss of biodiversity has been further exacerbated by the economic, health and social challenges created by Covid-19. However, the pandemic has also brought communities together and enabled people to rediscover a connection with the natural world.

 

Nature-based solutions will play a crucial role in addressing the challenges of our climate emergency and in the post Covid-19 recovery. A recent survey by Natural Cambridgeshire reveals how 77% of participants said that visiting parks and countryside in the region had been very important to them during lockdown.

 

The RSPB’s ‘Recovering Together’ report provides clear evidence of public support for putting nature at the heart of our pandemic recovery. 89% of those surveyed believe that increasing the amount of accessible nature-rich green space will help to improve people’s general health, wellbeing, and happiness.

 

Doubling nature will deliver significant protection, restoration, and enhancement of key wildlife habitats for the landscape we know and love. Improved green space and access to nature will help people to enjoy and appreciate the nature around them, leading to healthier and happier lives.

 

Doubling nature will create a more resilient countryside and communities, where nature is at the heart of our approach to tackling the climate emergency. It will support a green transport infrastructure, where priority is given to walkers, cyclists, and riders. Doubling nature will also influence sustainable farming practices and tourism.

 

The achievement of these objectives will create a better quality of life for residents and visitors through a local environment with easy access to rich and inspiring nature.

 

Lord Chris Smith says: “Over the past six months we’ve re-learned and re-discovered how vitally important our relationship with nature is, for all of us, and how it helps us to grow stronger, wiser and happier. That’s true on a global scale as we face the challenges of climate change; but it’s even more true on our doorstep, and there’s no better place to start than here in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.”

 

Dame Fiona Reynolds adds: “The urgent need to reverse nature’s decline is well known, but we are making desperately slow progress. The COVID-19 crisis has also shown us just how much we all need access to nature. The ambition to ‘double nature’ in Cambridgeshire could not be more timely or important.”

 

Richard Astle, Chairperson of Natural Cambridgeshire, explains: “Nature matters to us all – and Cambridgeshire and Peterborough have an opportunity to lead the way in helping nature to recover from its catastrophic local declines. Last year we set out the ambition of doubling nature. This year we are setting out detailed ideas for how we can all play our part in making that happen. And if we do, we can make our county an even better place to live, work, and visit. Doubling nature means more wildlife, it also means cleaner air and water and more places for people to walk, ride and cycle and enjoy green, open spaces.”

The ‘Doubling Nature in Action’ event will be held on Wednesday 16th September, 10am-12.30pm, via Zoom. Attendees can register for the event at: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_b9whn9sqS0GOrLEX_Rx59A.

[1] https://www.rspb.org.uk/globalassets/downloads/recovering-together-report/recovering-together-report_nature-and-green-recovery_rspbyougov_june-2020.pdf

RSPB Calls Out UK’s Lost Decade for Nature

RSPB calls out UK’s lost decade for nature as the UN reveals ten years of missed targets.

 

  • UK failure on international environmental targets revealed by the RSPB on eve of major UN report
  • RSPB analysis of the UK’s self-assessment reveals the picture may be worse than reported, raising doubts some targets have not been met and highlighting areas where the UK has regressed
  • The UK must recognise the opportunity to make urgent changes at home which can be used to provide international leadership ahead of negotiating the next global plan to save nature and the climate in 2021
  • To get nature’s recovery back on track the RSPB is launching the Revive Our World campaign, pushing for legally binding targets to restore nature by 2030 and ensure there is not another decade of failure

On the eve of a major United Nations report, which will show the international community has failed to halt environmental decline over the last 10 years, new analysis from the RSPB has revealed the UK’s self-assessment is overly optimistic as high environmental ambitions have not led to real progress being made.

The Global Biodiversity Outlook 5, published tomorrow by the United Nations, will contain no country-level breakdowns of how the UK has fared, but an RSPB report ‘A Lost Decade for Nature’, will reveal our true performance.

With UK wildlife continuing to decline and vital habitat being lost or degraded the ability of the governments of the UK to revive our world will depend on an honest assessment of the work needed. While the UK Government believes it has met a third of its targets, RSPB analysis shows the UK may have met as few as just 3 of the 20 international targets it agreed to a decade ago, and in six areas the UK has actually gone backwards.

A decade ago, ‘the Aichi Targets’ were hailed as the blueprint for saving life on Earth and reversing the terrible losses in wildlife and the natural environment seen over previous decades. The RSPB believes the cause for their failure was that the targets were not legally binding, so Governments around the world, including in the UK, were not compelled to act.

Beccy Speight, chief executive at the RSPB said: “Even the Government’s optimistic assessment should act as a wake-up call that words alone will not revive our world or tackle the twin crises facing nature and climate.

“Next year we have the opportunity to play a leading role in developing a new set of global targets to restore nature. But first we need an honest assessment that recognises we need to do much more at home. We have targets enshrined in law to tackle the climate emergency, but none, yet, to reverse the crisis facing nature. We cannot be in this same position in 2030 with our natural world vanishing due to inaction.”

To ensure the next decade is not again lost to inaction the RSPB is launching the Revive Our World campaign tomorrow, pushing for legally binding targets to restore nature and deliver a green recovery across all Governments of the UK.

The RSPB analysis reveals the UK Government’s key Aichi failures to be:

  • The UK’s wildlife is vanishing. The UK Government’s own assessment claims to be making progress towards saving our most threatened species, while all the evidence points to the contrary. According to State of Nature (2019) 41% of UK species are in decline and 133 species have been lost from our shores completely since 1950. In the most comprehensive assessment of nature in the UK scientists looked at almost 8,500 species, finding that over one in ten (15%) is threatened with extinction. There are no signs of these trends slowing.
  • Not enough land is being protected or managed for nature. Although the UK claims to be protecting large areas of land (28%) and sea (24%), closer inspection reveals that this includes National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty that are not well managed for nature, and Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) that are in poor health and not adequately monitored. With recent reports of a lack of inspections or assessments, along with species loss at these locations, the amount of land protected and well-managed for nature could be as low as 5% of the UK. At sea, although new protected areas have been announced, only 10% of these are being actively managed.
  • Insufficient funding for nature conservation. During the past decade public funding for the environment and nature has declined in the UK from £641 million (2012/13) to just £456 million (2017/18), a drop of almost 30%. Adjusting for inflation this represents a decrease of over a quarter of a billion Pounds (£256m). Funding is vital for creating and protecting important habitat as well as ensuring the condition of our natural world is being monitored so action can be taken swiftly when needed. The UK Government claims it has made progress, but at an insufficient rate. The figures show otherwise.

Beccy Speight added: “This is a global issue, and something that will take a generation to resolve, however the hard work must start today. The UK is not alone in failing to meet the ambitious targets set out ten years ago, but it is now time that the high ambitions set by successive Governments becomes action at home as well as leading the international effort.

“We now need people across the UK to stand up for nature, to let our politicians know this is not good enough and we demand they revive our world. Every country in the UK must create legally binding targets to restore nature, invest in nature and green jobs, and support farmers to produce healthy food that’s good for people, climate and wildlife. We have to put our money where our mouth is and use the next decade to do something truly impressive.”

To put the UK back on track, the RSPB is launching a campaign to Revive our World that will give everyone a place to voice their concerns and outrage at the inaction of the UK, as well as proposing the legislation and priorities the UK and devolved Governments must set to avoid another lost decade. To find out more visit www.rspb.org.uk/ReviveOurWorld

 

Case study: the plight of the Wash and the Redshank 

The UK government states that 28% of land in the UK is currently protected for nature, but many of those protected areas are struggling.

The Wash in Eastern England, for example, is England’s largest Site of Special Scientific Interest and is currently listed as being in ‘favourable’ condition.

This is despite data from the RSPB showing populations plummeting for threatened species such as the redshank.

In some areas across the Wash this striking red-legged wading bird, often called the ‘sentinel of the marshes for their warning call, has declined by as much as 79%.

A drop that severe is meant to automatically trigger the listing of The Wash as ‘unfavourable’ – but a lack of funding for Natural England’s regular monitoring has let this go unnoticed.

The RSPB does all it can for these threatened birds at its wonderful network of nature reserves and beyond, but if the wider landscape is not well managed for nature as it should be, it will always be fighting an uphill battle.

 

Case Study: Our uplands up in smoke

Vast tracts of the UK’s uplands are covered in peatland habitats, which have been depositing carbon-rich peat for thousands of years. In places, particularly on flatter areas, the peat is metres deep. Though our upland peatlands are of international importance and home to special wildlife, they are in poor health, with large areas lacking precious peat-forming vegetation, especially sphagnum mosses.

Over the years, peatlands have been damaged by pollution (associated with the industrial revolution), drainage, livestock grazing and burning. Each of these, sometimes in combination, has had a negative impact on hydrology and peatland vegetation, with large areas now in urgent need of restoration.

The state of our upland peatlands is not helped by repeated burning to improve heather cover for red grouse. Despite peatlands being identified as sensitive (no-burn areas), peatland vegetation is still burnt each year, particularly in England and Scotland, to create a patchwork of young and old heather – grouse prefer to feed on young (more nutritious) heather and nest/hide in longer heather.

Upland peat bogs store an estimated 2,000 megatons of carbon. But our precious blanket bogs are in a very sorry state – in England they release 350,000 tonnes CO2 to the atmosphere each year – the same as 140,000 cars. And despite wanting to lead the world on climate change, our Governments continue to allow our uplands to be set ablaze each year.

The RSPB is calling for an immediate end to burning in the uplands and for peatlands to be restored, protecting the stored carbon, ensuring the peatlands remain wet and resilient to a changing climate (especially drought and associated wildfire) and allowing special species to thrive.

 

Moss Social – New Business Start up During Lock Down

Nicola Moss of Moss Social is doing an interview with Nene Local Magazine – the latest in a series seeing how local businesses and charities have been fairing during the pandemic ….

We spoke to Nicola based in Market Harborough;.

Moss Social is a social media management business.

Nicola Moss

Nicola Moss

We asked Nicola to give us a description of what that means.

Social media has become more important to small businesses than ever before, with consumers doing most of their research into purchasing decisions online. If you’re not represented effectively on social media channels, your business may get left behind. This was the position I was in when I was employed by a local tourist attraction. We were told in no uncertain terms to embrace social media or your competitors will and you will struggle to attract visitors via the traditional channels alone.  I set to, learning how to make the most of social media from scratch so I appreciate it’s a lot to take on board when you’re already running a business. If I can help small businesses by taking the load on the marketing side whilst they focus on doing what they do and love best, I’m a very happy lady!

 

We wanted to know how Moss Social had faired during the pandemic.

 

“I only set up my business last week!” Nicola exclaimed, “I had intended to launch in March and then got cold feet. I have, though, been supporting a couple of businesses throughout the pandemic and social media has enabled them to keep in constant touch with their audience.”

 

Nene Local Magazine added, have you changed what you do – tell us how?

 

“I have indeed! I was working for the FSB until the beginning of September, which has given me the opportunity to speak with many small business owners and helped me see that there was a need for what I’m offering.”

 

We were interested to see what new sills Nicola has gained.

 

In February, I signed up to an online business course, which I completed whilst working full-time in quite difficult circumstances. I do believe in being a life-long learner as it keeps those little grey cells functioning well!

 

Are these skills going to benefit your business?

The business course has definitely benefited me as I have learnt about email marketing, creating engaging content, how to create a website and SEO to name a few essential elements for any business.

 

So what personal lessons have you learnt in lockdown?

Be courageous! Life is too short to settle for “safe”. I have so many good friends and supporters around me, cheering me on, I feel so grateful for their good wishes.

 

My life has already changed enormously as I have left full-time employment for the first time in my life to travel the self-employed route. I want to make this decision really count.

Moss Social Working in the Garden

Moss Social Working in the Garden

For More Information:

Moss social has a website https://www.mosssocial.co.uk/ where you can read a little more about what they offer. You can contact Nicola on 07432 766001 or nicola@mosssocial.co.uk or if you’d like to receive her 10 top tips to make your social media more effective, sign up here. https://www.subscribepage.com/mosssocial

Find Moss Social here:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/nicola-moss/

https://www.facebook.com/MossSocial

https://www.instagram.com/nicmoss1/

https://twitter.com/nicolamoss6